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A temple convert

Ed Chapman's picture
Project
Draft: 
Block Twill
Project Status: 
Weaving
Project Date: 
Fri, 01/20/2017
Yarn
Yarn: 8/2 CotLin
Color: natural
Type: warp
Yarn: 8/2 CotLin
Color: natural and sea green
Type: weft
Loom
Number of Shafts: 
8
Sett: 
24.00 EPI
Notes: 

I just started a set of 6 cottolin towels. Since I like larger towels, I decided to try using a temple. What a wonderful thing. The temple stabilizes the weaving front very well, and I no longer have to stop and check for draw-in. I am a convert. I believe my speed is better too.

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Joanne Hall's picture
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Joined: 06/11/2009
Thanks

Thanks for sending us your good report.  I really like hearing positive comments.

Joanne

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Queezle's picture
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Joined: 10/18/2012
temple consideration

Ed, its great to hear you say this.  Trying out temples for whole projects are among my personal goals for 2017.  I did get to try a temple for about an hour when Joanne did a workshop for our guild, and thought it ok but annoying to keep moving.  However I bet that is like everything else in weaving, you get used to it, especially if it helps the weaving.

What type of temple are you using?  I know Joanne is a fan of the glimakra temples, and they are beautiful, but they do cover a fair bit of the weaving (making keeping your place in the weaving a bit more difficult).  But the metal temples I've seen have very long teeth, and seem primarily suited to rugs. 

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ReedGuy's picture
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Joined: 01/13/2012
temple

I never weave without one, and I weave overshot quite often. I'm now weaving 9 yards of it for bath robe, temple in place. I break up the pattern in 3rds to move the temple. I have gotten accustomed to just looking at the cloth to see where I am at. But my Leclerc temples have a narrow kneck that I can easily see after moving the temple, the new cloth forming against the previous woven. I leave 1/4 of cloth ahead of the temple each move. I can look at the cloth and know if I threw the wrong pick, the weft will look out of place, like a "run" in the cloth. I move every inch to inch and 1/2 when using a temple. On this piece it's no more than an inch. By the time I do a 96 pick repeat I move the temple 3 times, that's a little over 2" of cloth.

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ShawnC's picture
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Joined: 01/16/2015
I also love temples. My

I also love temples. My favorites are the metal Toika. I use them even for fine threads and have no problems. These were what I found used, and so I adapted to them. Working for me!

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Queezle's picture
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Joined: 10/18/2012
Good to know!

Great information from weavers I truly respect.

 

I think I have a line on some used temples, and so won't worry too much about the type.  I also think I will purchase tempotreadle for my 8-harness loom (the main one I use), which would minimize any errors from not seeing where I am in a pattern.  Though tepotreadle is not inexpensive, I am comparing its cost to that of making a project that ends up having treadling errors.  Time is precious.

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Ed Chapman's picture
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Joined: 08/28/2016
My first temple is a Glimakra

It is well-made- soem kind of lightwood, maybe alder- not too hard. Also has brass and steel components. The tenterhooks (LOVE this word) are a bluish mettal that looks exactly like what I have seen on carpet tacks. It is sharp, but the angled ends protect a little.

I agree that the width of the temple does obscure newly woven areas- and I have had to take out some picks when I see an error that as obscured by the temple. Buit overall I do feel more confident with my beats and my edges look a lot better with (it seems) less effort.

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Joanne Hall's picture
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Joined: 06/11/2009
temple, wood and metal

If the temple is opened, you can see the fabric.  If not opened, as when you weave for instance, a 16 inch wide warp with a 16-23 inch temple, then you don't see much of the fabric.  But the same temple on a 22 in wide warp will show you all of what you have woven.

Also, when setting in the temple, leave 1/2 inch visible at the fell line.  With that showing, you will see when you need to correct something.

For Scandinavian looms, which are not jack looms, and table looms which do not have a shuttle race, wood or metal temples are fine.

But, I prefer the wooden temples as they are not so heavy. 

If you get metal temples, you have to learn to keep them away from the wood, as the teeth go down rather than out and they will scratch the breast beam and the beater.  So, you need to set them even more than 1/2 inch from the fell, if you have a jack loom with a shuttle race.   I would not use the metal temples at all for jack looms.   I recommend the wooden ones.  The teeth do not go down far enough to scratch.

Joanne

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ShawnC's picture
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Joined: 01/16/2015
Ah, yes, Joanne! this is true

Ah, yes, Joanne! this is true about the metal temples. On a new to me loom I had the beater set too high and had gouges in it before I realized! Luckily it's a loom I won't ever part with, so a little wood putty and sanding fixed it all up. But care is important.

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Joanne Hall's picture
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Joined: 06/11/2009
wooden temples

When I teach classes at John Campbell, I supply wooden temples for the class, as they have mostly metal ones.  And I don't want to be responsible for scratches on the looms.  The metal ones can be successfully used without harm to the looms, but I usually have a good share of beginners in the class.  In each class, I have students asking where they can purchase temples, as they experience the advantages of using them.

Joanne

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ReedGuy's picture
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Joined: 01/13/2012
I would probably consider a

I would probably consider a metal temple as a rug temple. I have a home made temple that is a rug temple, the teeth are downward and is made of beefier wood parts. I know I could stand on the sucker with it leaning and it is strong and stiff much like walking on flooring. I would not dare stand on a thinner wooden one. :)

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