Book resources for warp finishes

As promised here are some of the books I am working thru on experimenting with weft finishes plus suggestions are updated as folks post them!

Finishing Touches for the Handweaver by Virginia West  isbn 1-8231-5016-x  good line illustrations

Joinings, Edges and Trims by Jean Wilson   isbn 0-442-29538-3 wide range of finishes and tassels

Finishes in the Ethnic Tradition by S Baizerman and Karen Searle  isbn 0-932394-12-4 by far my favorite because of the clear line drawings

Compendium of Finishing Techniques Naomi McEneely isbn 1-931499-19-5

Design Collection #19 Interweave Press, Scarves and Shawls for all Seasons  isbn 1-931499-17-9

Rug Weaving Techniques, Beyond the Basics by Peter Collingwood ISBN 0-934026-62-9

Carolyn Ambuter's The Open Canvas, which explores various 'pulled weft' and 'pulled warp' embroidery techniques.  The diagrams of needle paths are very clear, and many of the techniques could be applied to warp and weft and hems while stretched on the loom.  We can plan ahead, and instead of removing warps and/or wefts from a woven canvas, we can leave them out while we warp and weave.  ISBN-10: 0894801716 

 

 

 

 

Comments

Posted on Wed, 09/09/2009 - 20:24

Both of Peter Collingwood's rug books have sections on warp finishes that I want to try. I'm in somewhat of a rut with my blanket fringes, either knotting in 4s or using Damascus edge.  Jean Wilson's book you mentioned is my current favourite, but I ordered your fave to see if it will be even better.

I'm also checking some embroidery books I have that include pulled warp and weft techniques, because there are often hemstitch ideas and other needle-weaving tricks that can be used on the loom.  We don't need to remove warp or weft, because we can plan ahead and leave spaces. If only I would remember to plan ahead....

Posted on Mon, 09/14/2009 - 19:42

 Loominaria, I am a rug weaver and one of my favorite finishes is what I call a cobra head (my name for it) finish out of Peter Collingwood's 2nd book.  He just refers to it as something on some Middle Eastern rugs and I think Jason said it was from some rugs in one of the London museums.  It is illustrated on page 50 of Rug Weaving Techniques and the explanation starts on p 149.  Both sides make an elegant finish.  I recommend it for your blankets.  You can go as small as 5 pairs in the knot and go up as many pairs in the finish as you think balances your work.  

I think the finish is too fiddley (as Jason says) to use on a scarf but I think it would be striking on a blanket.  

Regards  Deb

Posted on Wed, 09/16/2009 - 02:42

I don't have a closeup but when I have time I'll take some close ups of the cotton and wool rugs that I have not sold that I have on hand where I used that finish....here is a link to my old webpage with one of the rugs, click on the lower right hand one.

homepage.mac.com/debmcclintock/PhotoAlbum9.html

ah, as promised above here are some photos of this finish on my project stuff page, here's the link:

www.weavolution.com/node/5376

 

Posted on Wed, 09/16/2009 - 00:34

Thanks, I noticed that one as I was reviewing his books.  I thought it would be a great way to gather ends toward a central point for finishing with kumihimo ties for an inkle or tablet-woven belt.  And I'm into fiddley scarves sometimes, so anything might happen!

Another book I've been looking at from a weaving perspective is Carolyn Ambuter's The Open Canvas, which explores various 'pulled weft' and 'pulled warp' embroidery techniques.  The diagrams of needle paths are very clear, and many of the techniques could be applied to warp and weft and hems while stretched on the loom.  We can plan ahead, and instead of removing warps and/or wefts from a woven canvas, we can leave them out while we warp and weave.

I'm pondering a 100 percent woven or perhaps Ghordes-knotted rug for my kitchen, so I'll be looking more at Collingwood's books for that.  Not sure yet if I'll test the strength of one of my rigid heddle looms or whether I'll play it safe and try to work on the Mirrix tapestry loom instead.  I still haven't made heddles for the Mirrix.  Time just scurries away these days!

Oh...you mention pairs for the 'cobra head'--and Mr. Collingwood says it must be an odd number to center the gathering.  Do you start with two warp ends in the centre to make it come out right?  Or are you less persnickety about having the gathering in the exact centre?

Posted on Wed, 09/16/2009 - 02:45

 Loominaria, I've posted some photos, here's the link:

www.weavolution.com/node/5376

re your question of the pairs, I use an odd # of pairs.  Due to the structure and my choice of weft some of my rugs are doubled in the dent so it is just easier to balance the rug if I stay with the pairs.  Hence I might use an odd # of doubles, as in 18 singles for 9 pairs.  The knot visually balances with an odd # of pairs or singles  Hope this makes sense.  Deb 

 

Posted on Wed, 09/16/2009 - 03:17

 Having met many of the spouses where I work, I'm familiar with 'a number of odd pairs', so it's easy to understand 'an odd number of pairs' as a related but quite different concept.  Thanks for the photos.  Your rugs are very beautiful.  I would have to put them on the wall as art pieces.  -- Kurt