Welcome and Introductions

Welcome to Saori Freestyle Weaving on Weavolution!

Please come in, introduce yourself and share your ideas, questions and inspirations.

Happy Weaving,

Terri (SaoriSaltSpring)

 

Comments

Posted on Fri, 06/12/2009 - 11:55

Hi everyone!  I'm Christine (please call me Cheeky).  While I haven't done any Saori weaving in the traditional sence, what I have done is to weave with yarns that I have spun myself that are navajo (chain) plied.  By pulling a part hand dyed rovings in a random way, navajo plying, then weaving the yarns onto themselves, the fabrics have this sort of plaid look to them.  If I use the navajo plied yarns in either in just the warp or weft the colors pattern in in the most wonderful ways.  I think my use of this spinning technique to achive a random yet harmonius look is right in keeping with the saori ideal.  You can see my work on my blog (http://www.getaclew.blogspot.com/) or on my flickr set Woven Stuff (http://www.flickr.com/photos/cheekyredhead/sets/72157602767100549/

I was also one of the weavers for The Thread Project: One World One Cloth (http://www.threadproject.com/asp/default.asp) The panel I wove is part of Lienzo Luminoso:Cloth of Light.  Some of the materials I worked with were data tape, guitar strings, as well as various strings, yarns, and ribbons.

Posted on Sat, 06/13/2009 - 04:42

Hi Cheeky - I love love love the Thread Project and all that it was about.  I have been doing a lot of public peace weaving and so this really speaks to me!

Beautiful spinning - that looks like great yarn to work with.

Happy Weaving,

Terri

 

Posted on Sat, 06/13/2009 - 13:40

Thank you Terri. If I do say so myself, yes my handspun is wonderful to work with.  If you'd ever like to try some let me know and I'll be happy to share.

Posted on Fri, 06/19/2009 - 19:36

Hi Everyone,

I'm Trish and my interest in Saori freestyle weaving comes from a desire to weave in the same unstructured way that I collage, paint and draw. (www.trishlapointe.com to see what I mean by that). I haven't loved my loom as much as I though I would all these years, because I was mentored in weaving by someone who really loves complex drafts, and regular geometric patterns. I, on the other hand, love the simplicity of plain weave, the gentle imperfection of nature, and the kind of art that just happens when you listen to your heart. I think I am going to enjoy Saori weaving very much.

I have a rainbow warp on my loom right now, with a tote bag in mind. I think I want to begin by rummaging my weaving supplies for whatever yarns appeal to me, and we shall see how it all turns out. All those stripes are begging  to be broken up by undulating forms, but that's all I can say about it right now.

 

If anyone has stories about their 'unlearning' process in weaving, please let me know.

 

 

Posted on Fri, 06/19/2009 - 22:17

Hi Trish,

I love your journals and through your website found my way to your blog about your weaving - I look forward to seeing you explore undulating forms on your rainbow warp.

Unlearning has certainly been a process for me - one that I was more than ready for.  I had been doing traditional weaving for 20+ years (as a hobby, for sale and on commission, but never my full-time work) when I saw Saori and fell in love with it.

At times I still find myself thinking of the 'lessons' I learned through the Master Weavers program - about selvedges, about an even beat, about this and about that.  Sometimes I then end up just gathering all sorts of yarns and 'treasure' around me and just weave quickly without thinking - some of this, some of that, what if I just wove on this half of the warp for a while, pull in another colour, some roving and before you know it, I'm over the thinking about the 'lessons' and I'm into the playing with colour and texture and imagination!

I also love the inspiration of weaving with others, the learning from the group and the sharing of ideas - this always opens up possibilities.

Happy Weaving,

Terri

Posted on Fri, 06/19/2009 - 23:23

Hi everyone, my name is Rona

I'm originally Canadian and I learned to weave in Canada.  I was so taken with weaving I bought my own loom and happily wove my house warm with blankets and shawls and dressed my tables with handwovens.  I even dressed me in handwovens.  Then we moved to Australia and I unfortunately sold my loom.  I always meant to replace it but once we arrived I found that I could not afford to buy one here.  I did bring my home made Salish loom with me and made a few things with that.  What I did revive here was my love of spinning.  Now I found the Saori looms at an affordable price I am in the process of ordering one.  I can't wait for it to arrive.  I love the concept of "free" weaving.   Although I loved learning to weave with drafts and all the "proper" weaving methods I am more of a free spirit and love breaking the rules.  My spinning is like that.  I don't want to produce something that can be made by a machine.  I dislike and find it tedious to make two exactly the same of anything.

I'm thinking about putting up a website, my son says it is quite rewarding to have one so he is in the process of teaching an old dog new tricks and helping me create one.  I almost never sell my products using them for gifts rather than profit.  Now my children are adults perhaps I will change my spots and do something completely different.  Make things to sell---who would have thought!

:) Weaving

Rona

Posted on Fri, 06/19/2009 - 23:26

Hi I'm Doe from NZ,

Into winter at the moment. I'm trying to 'unlearn' too. I like weaving plain weave best and usually on a fairly portable loom. I do have a floor loom and work on more formal weaving usually for commissions. But my favourite form of weaving is with a pile of handspun yarns around my feet. I'm always trying to find 'play time' , I do a lot of weaving in my head:)

Posted on Sun, 06/21/2009 - 00:46

Welcome, welcome Doe & Thumbleinaspins.

How interesting this idea of 'unlearning' and also learning from each other.

I find that weaving with others really does make a difference!  I teach two young girls (now just turned 7) and I am always learning from them.  If they decide they are going to make a bag, they just do it.  Sew here, sew here, lets twist a handle and sew it on.  Not a bunch of planning or figuring, just creating.  It reminds me to just try things.

I love that your spinning thumbelinaspins does look like handspun and so indeed why not have handweaving that looks handwoven! 

Thanks for both of your introductions and thoughts.

Happy Weaving,

Terri

Posted on Sun, 06/21/2009 - 01:43

Hi, I'm another Aussie and live in the northern suburbs of Adelaide in South Australia. I have several looms, most of them built by me because of the cost, as Thumbelina mentions, and also because its just soooooo hard to get a loom here unless you have a truck.

I love the saori concept, and after visiting your lovely and intersting web-sites, it seems close to how I weave. As I've got older the idea of rigidly disciplined weaving has gone straight out the window! I have problems bending over, so heddles and treadles are generally very hard and it can take many days to warp a 4 shaft loom.  Smaller looms, while easier to physically manage, also provide a greater challenge to my creativity.

I spin my own yarn so its nice to follow that yarn through to its end-use. I also like the feel of the fibres I spin, so I aim to make my yarn very touchable, and try to follow this through to the end product.

Its only in the last year I have really been able to devote much time to weaving - I have woven sporadically before that, and I hopefully can develope a routine that gives me time with my looms on a regular basis, as like my spinning, I find it very soothing and satisfying to create something out of a cloud of fluff.

Posted on Wed, 06/24/2009 - 05:57

Hello to the Saori weaving group! (This is a repost because I seem to have introduced myself in the wrong location)

My name (and username) is Nancy and I'm a spinner and weaver (and retired teacher) in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. I learned about saori weaving at the OHS (Ontario Handweavers and Spinners) conference earlier this spring; I attended a mini lecture introducing the topic and showing many samples. I don't remember the woman's name but she was a new and enthusiastic saori weaver who had attended a saori workshop recently. The joy, beauty, simplicity and inclusiveness of saori weaving resonated strongly with me and I was hooked. I have researched on the internet and hope to free up a loom to try it soon. I am currently working on an overshot rug. I'm happy to have found this group and will be visiting here often.

Nancy

.

Posted on Thu, 06/25/2009 - 05:09

Hi all:

Most of this is a re-post, as I also introduced myself in the wrong place.  What I should have added is that I'm trying to make my own loom out of a set of stretcher bars bought at an art supply store.  I'll post pics when I am done. 

My name is Stephanie.   I joined the Saori weaving group because, until exploring this new (to me) site, weavology, I'd never heard of it before.  When I did an internet search for "What is Saori weaving?"  I found an article  describing Saori weaving as improvisational and from the heart,  and it sounded fun! So I decided to join this group to learn more. 

Aside from a children's potholder loom when I was young, I've not done much weaving.  I have done some knitting, but I find that I have a lot of hand pain when I knit, so I started looking into weaving, thinking that keeping the product on a loom will allow me to continue to work with yarn without the pain.  I checked out a few books from the library, and became determined to learn more.

I do own a few small hand-help weavette syle looms, bought off ebay, and haven't really been able to use them as they didn't come with instructions and I am having trouble figuring out how to warp them properly.  I also have a couple of stretcher frames that I want to make into bigger looms, hoping to do some tapestry and/or free form weaving.  I hope to be able to purchase a rigid heddle loom, but that is at least a few months away. 

I'm looking forward to meeting other members of the group, making connections with other weavers and creative fiber lovers.  I'm hoping to get tips on how to make my own simple looms, and how to properly warp them so that I can get weaving!

Thanks!

Posted on Tue, 06/30/2009 - 00:40

Hello,  I am Alison, and I have never really woven anything like Saori.  Most everything I weave is loom-controlled, but I am intereseted in learning more about Saori, to work the other side of my brain!  Thanks for letting me join!

Posted on Tue, 06/30/2009 - 11:02

hi Alison,

you are welcome ! You really should try Saori -weaving . I am still learning or should we say unlearning because Saori is letting go what you learned and weave  by the inspiration of the moment. essentialy it is woven on only two shafts but almost any loom can be used.another point is sharing ideas and learning from each other in the group. so feel free to ask any questions .

I took a quick look at your projects;very nice weaving !

jeannine

ps for more information check out group admin. projects there are links to saori- websites.

Posted on Sun, 07/05/2009 - 21:59

So nice to meet so many people who are interested in Saori and are trying out this freestyle weaving.  Please feel free to start a new topic with questions, ideas, etc.  Part of the Saori philosophy is "Let’s learn from everyone in the group. "

In Saori there are no levels - no beginners, intermediate or advanced - all are weavers with thoughts, ideas and inspirations to share. 

Jump in and enjoy, post your projects, ask questions and Happy Weaving!

Terri

www.saorisaltspring.com

Posted on Tue, 07/14/2009 - 23:47

Hey,

I'm not much of a weaver (yet) thought the looms begin to flock around the living room. Saori weaving appeals to me cause it's lively, it has nothing of the stilted "this is the only correct way to do this" teaching that let's say apprenticing to a master weaver would bring along. It's a way to express feelings and those don't always come in even 2/2 twills.

I joined this group cause I saw Terri's work on Ravelry already and loved it, so I thought, ok, let's take this as a starting point into Weavolution (which I really haven't explored too much yet, let's see how far I get with that)

 

Other than that, happy weaving :-) I love to see what ideas others come up with.

Posted on Wed, 07/15/2009 - 05:34

Welcome Asherra!  Flocking looms sounds like a good start ...

Glad you have joined us, hope there are some things that others are doing that inspire you and we look forward to seeing where you take Saori!

Happy Weaving,

Terri

Posted on Sat, 07/25/2009 - 00:05

I am totally new to Saori weaving. I'm still not sure what it is but I think it is very cool. Hope to learn more from this group.

DJ

Posted on Sat, 07/25/2009 - 14:49

Welcome to SAORI!

Yes, SAORI is very cool! It is such a relaxation and a therapeutic style of weaving.

You just need to enjoy the moment of "weaving" rather than being worried about finished product.

No pressure, No textbook, No samples.....That is why I enjoy SAORI so much!

I am in MN, away from ocean, but I grew up by the pacific ocean in Japan where SAORI is from.

Since, I was so close to ocean, it is nice to be away from ocean.....

I am by the lakes. Yes, State of 10000 Lakes, Minnesota!

Let's learn together as a group!

Chiaki(saorifun)

 

 

 

Posted on Sun, 07/26/2009 - 17:46

I am in Florida, State of 10000 Mosquitos. Just kidding....well, sort of. The picture in your avatar is beautiful....is that an example of Saori?

DJ

Posted on Fri, 06/12/2009 - 11:55

Hi everyone!  I'm Christine (please call me Cheeky).  While I haven't done any Saori weaving in the traditional sence, what I have done is to weave with yarns that I have spun myself that are navajo (chain) plied.  By pulling a part hand dyed rovings in a random way, navajo plying, then weaving the yarns onto themselves, the fabrics have this sort of plaid look to them.  If I use the navajo plied yarns in either in just the warp or weft the colors pattern in in the most wonderful ways.  I think my use of this spinning technique to achive a random yet harmonius look is right in keeping with the saori ideal.  You can see my work on my blog (http://www.getaclew.blogspot.com/) or on my flickr set Woven Stuff (http://www.flickr.com/photos/cheekyredhead/sets/72157602767100549/

I was also one of the weavers for The Thread Project: One World One Cloth (http://www.threadproject.com/asp/default.asp) The panel I wove is part of Lienzo Luminoso:Cloth of Light.  Some of the materials I worked with were data tape, guitar strings, as well as various strings, yarns, and ribbons.

Posted on Sat, 06/13/2009 - 04:42

Hi Cheeky - I love love love the Thread Project and all that it was about.  I have been doing a lot of public peace weaving and so this really speaks to me!

Beautiful spinning - that looks like great yarn to work with.

Happy Weaving,

Terri

 

Posted on Sat, 06/13/2009 - 13:40

Thank you Terri. If I do say so myself, yes my handspun is wonderful to work with.  If you'd ever like to try some let me know and I'll be happy to share.

Posted on Fri, 06/19/2009 - 19:36

Hi Everyone,

I'm Trish and my interest in Saori freestyle weaving comes from a desire to weave in the same unstructured way that I collage, paint and draw. (www.trishlapointe.com to see what I mean by that). I haven't loved my loom as much as I though I would all these years, because I was mentored in weaving by someone who really loves complex drafts, and regular geometric patterns. I, on the other hand, love the simplicity of plain weave, the gentle imperfection of nature, and the kind of art that just happens when you listen to your heart. I think I am going to enjoy Saori weaving very much.

I have a rainbow warp on my loom right now, with a tote bag in mind. I think I want to begin by rummaging my weaving supplies for whatever yarns appeal to me, and we shall see how it all turns out. All those stripes are begging  to be broken up by undulating forms, but that's all I can say about it right now.

 

If anyone has stories about their 'unlearning' process in weaving, please let me know.

 

 

Posted on Fri, 06/19/2009 - 22:17

Hi Trish,

I love your journals and through your website found my way to your blog about your weaving - I look forward to seeing you explore undulating forms on your rainbow warp.

Unlearning has certainly been a process for me - one that I was more than ready for.  I had been doing traditional weaving for 20+ years (as a hobby, for sale and on commission, but never my full-time work) when I saw Saori and fell in love with it.

At times I still find myself thinking of the 'lessons' I learned through the Master Weavers program - about selvedges, about an even beat, about this and about that.  Sometimes I then end up just gathering all sorts of yarns and 'treasure' around me and just weave quickly without thinking - some of this, some of that, what if I just wove on this half of the warp for a while, pull in another colour, some roving and before you know it, I'm over the thinking about the 'lessons' and I'm into the playing with colour and texture and imagination!

I also love the inspiration of weaving with others, the learning from the group and the sharing of ideas - this always opens up possibilities.

Happy Weaving,

Terri

Posted on Fri, 06/19/2009 - 23:23

Hi everyone, my name is Rona

I'm originally Canadian and I learned to weave in Canada.  I was so taken with weaving I bought my own loom and happily wove my house warm with blankets and shawls and dressed my tables with handwovens.  I even dressed me in handwovens.  Then we moved to Australia and I unfortunately sold my loom.  I always meant to replace it but once we arrived I found that I could not afford to buy one here.  I did bring my home made Salish loom with me and made a few things with that.  What I did revive here was my love of spinning.  Now I found the Saori looms at an affordable price I am in the process of ordering one.  I can't wait for it to arrive.  I love the concept of "free" weaving.   Although I loved learning to weave with drafts and all the "proper" weaving methods I am more of a free spirit and love breaking the rules.  My spinning is like that.  I don't want to produce something that can be made by a machine.  I dislike and find it tedious to make two exactly the same of anything.

I'm thinking about putting up a website, my son says it is quite rewarding to have one so he is in the process of teaching an old dog new tricks and helping me create one.  I almost never sell my products using them for gifts rather than profit.  Now my children are adults perhaps I will change my spots and do something completely different.  Make things to sell---who would have thought!

:) Weaving

Rona

Posted on Fri, 06/19/2009 - 23:26

Hi I'm Doe from NZ,

Into winter at the moment. I'm trying to 'unlearn' too. I like weaving plain weave best and usually on a fairly portable loom. I do have a floor loom and work on more formal weaving usually for commissions. But my favourite form of weaving is with a pile of handspun yarns around my feet. I'm always trying to find 'play time' , I do a lot of weaving in my head:)

Posted on Sun, 06/21/2009 - 00:46

Welcome, welcome Doe & Thumbleinaspins.

How interesting this idea of 'unlearning' and also learning from each other.

I find that weaving with others really does make a difference!  I teach two young girls (now just turned 7) and I am always learning from them.  If they decide they are going to make a bag, they just do it.  Sew here, sew here, lets twist a handle and sew it on.  Not a bunch of planning or figuring, just creating.  It reminds me to just try things.

I love that your spinning thumbelinaspins does look like handspun and so indeed why not have handweaving that looks handwoven! 

Thanks for both of your introductions and thoughts.

Happy Weaving,

Terri

Posted on Sun, 06/21/2009 - 01:43

Hi, I'm another Aussie and live in the northern suburbs of Adelaide in South Australia. I have several looms, most of them built by me because of the cost, as Thumbelina mentions, and also because its just soooooo hard to get a loom here unless you have a truck.

I love the saori concept, and after visiting your lovely and intersting web-sites, it seems close to how I weave. As I've got older the idea of rigidly disciplined weaving has gone straight out the window! I have problems bending over, so heddles and treadles are generally very hard and it can take many days to warp a 4 shaft loom.  Smaller looms, while easier to physically manage, also provide a greater challenge to my creativity.

I spin my own yarn so its nice to follow that yarn through to its end-use. I also like the feel of the fibres I spin, so I aim to make my yarn very touchable, and try to follow this through to the end product.

Its only in the last year I have really been able to devote much time to weaving - I have woven sporadically before that, and I hopefully can develope a routine that gives me time with my looms on a regular basis, as like my spinning, I find it very soothing and satisfying to create something out of a cloud of fluff.

Posted on Wed, 06/24/2009 - 05:57

Hello to the Saori weaving group! (This is a repost because I seem to have introduced myself in the wrong location)

My name (and username) is Nancy and I'm a spinner and weaver (and retired teacher) in Hamilton, Ontario, Canada. I learned about saori weaving at the OHS (Ontario Handweavers and Spinners) conference earlier this spring; I attended a mini lecture introducing the topic and showing many samples. I don't remember the woman's name but she was a new and enthusiastic saori weaver who had attended a saori workshop recently. The joy, beauty, simplicity and inclusiveness of saori weaving resonated strongly with me and I was hooked. I have researched on the internet and hope to free up a loom to try it soon. I am currently working on an overshot rug. I'm happy to have found this group and will be visiting here often.

Nancy

.

Posted on Thu, 06/25/2009 - 05:09

Hi all:

Most of this is a re-post, as I also introduced myself in the wrong place.  What I should have added is that I'm trying to make my own loom out of a set of stretcher bars bought at an art supply store.  I'll post pics when I am done. 

My name is Stephanie.   I joined the Saori weaving group because, until exploring this new (to me) site, weavology, I'd never heard of it before.  When I did an internet search for "What is Saori weaving?"  I found an article  describing Saori weaving as improvisational and from the heart,  and it sounded fun! So I decided to join this group to learn more. 

Aside from a children's potholder loom when I was young, I've not done much weaving.  I have done some knitting, but I find that I have a lot of hand pain when I knit, so I started looking into weaving, thinking that keeping the product on a loom will allow me to continue to work with yarn without the pain.  I checked out a few books from the library, and became determined to learn more.

I do own a few small hand-help weavette syle looms, bought off ebay, and haven't really been able to use them as they didn't come with instructions and I am having trouble figuring out how to warp them properly.  I also have a couple of stretcher frames that I want to make into bigger looms, hoping to do some tapestry and/or free form weaving.  I hope to be able to purchase a rigid heddle loom, but that is at least a few months away. 

I'm looking forward to meeting other members of the group, making connections with other weavers and creative fiber lovers.  I'm hoping to get tips on how to make my own simple looms, and how to properly warp them so that I can get weaving!

Thanks!

Posted on Tue, 06/30/2009 - 00:40

Hello,  I am Alison, and I have never really woven anything like Saori.  Most everything I weave is loom-controlled, but I am intereseted in learning more about Saori, to work the other side of my brain!  Thanks for letting me join!

Posted on Tue, 06/30/2009 - 11:02

hi Alison,

you are welcome ! You really should try Saori -weaving . I am still learning or should we say unlearning because Saori is letting go what you learned and weave  by the inspiration of the moment. essentialy it is woven on only two shafts but almost any loom can be used.another point is sharing ideas and learning from each other in the group. so feel free to ask any questions .

I took a quick look at your projects;very nice weaving !

jeannine

ps for more information check out group admin. projects there are links to saori- websites.

Posted on Sun, 07/05/2009 - 21:59

So nice to meet so many people who are interested in Saori and are trying out this freestyle weaving.  Please feel free to start a new topic with questions, ideas, etc.  Part of the Saori philosophy is "Let’s learn from everyone in the group. "

In Saori there are no levels - no beginners, intermediate or advanced - all are weavers with thoughts, ideas and inspirations to share. 

Jump in and enjoy, post your projects, ask questions and Happy Weaving!

Terri

www.saorisaltspring.com

Posted on Tue, 07/14/2009 - 23:47

Hey,

I'm not much of a weaver (yet) thought the looms begin to flock around the living room. Saori weaving appeals to me cause it's lively, it has nothing of the stilted "this is the only correct way to do this" teaching that let's say apprenticing to a master weaver would bring along. It's a way to express feelings and those don't always come in even 2/2 twills.

I joined this group cause I saw Terri's work on Ravelry already and loved it, so I thought, ok, let's take this as a starting point into Weavolution (which I really haven't explored too much yet, let's see how far I get with that)

 

Other than that, happy weaving :-) I love to see what ideas others come up with.

Posted on Wed, 07/15/2009 - 05:34

Welcome Asherra!  Flocking looms sounds like a good start ...

Glad you have joined us, hope there are some things that others are doing that inspire you and we look forward to seeing where you take Saori!

Happy Weaving,

Terri

Posted on Sat, 07/25/2009 - 00:05

I am totally new to Saori weaving. I'm still not sure what it is but I think it is very cool. Hope to learn more from this group.

DJ

Posted on Sat, 07/25/2009 - 14:49

Welcome to SAORI!

Yes, SAORI is very cool! It is such a relaxation and a therapeutic style of weaving.

You just need to enjoy the moment of "weaving" rather than being worried about finished product.

No pressure, No textbook, No samples.....That is why I enjoy SAORI so much!

I am in MN, away from ocean, but I grew up by the pacific ocean in Japan where SAORI is from.

Since, I was so close to ocean, it is nice to be away from ocean.....

I am by the lakes. Yes, State of 10000 Lakes, Minnesota!

Let's learn together as a group!

Chiaki(saorifun)

 

 

 

Posted on Sun, 07/26/2009 - 17:46

I am in Florida, State of 10000 Mosquitos. Just kidding....well, sort of. The picture in your avatar is beautiful....is that an example of Saori?

DJ

Posted on Wed, 06/15/2011 - 23:24

Hello everyone,

I am just one year into weaving on a Rigid Heddle loom that I took a class for at my LYS and fell in love with weaving.  Most of what I know is from books, reading blogs, watching videos and participating in discussions like this one. I was found by a fellow RH weaver who also weaves Saori and encouraged me to try it...and I did, and I L-O-V-E it.  I'm working on my second piece as I write this and plan to do lots more.

Thank you for being here...can't wait to see all your lovely weavings.

Julia

Posted on Sat, 09/10/2011 - 23:46

Hello everyone,

My name is Melisa, from Alba Ranch.  It is possible I know some of you from the Rav group.  I just finished a large project that was shipped off to Michigan for Art Prize Art show in a few weeks.  I hand spun the yarn, wove it on a Rigid Heddle, crocheted it together and threw it in the washer and well... didn't know how it would come out. ha!  Jacket, wrap skirt in kilt fashion and matching bag.

 

Bits and Bobs

Back Detail of Bits and Bobs               Jacket Detail      Sleeve detail

Posted on Mon, 12/05/2011 - 06:05

A much delayed welcome to the SAORI group on Weavolution!  Glad to meet you both here.

I have just posted a recent collaborative project on my page - a dress made from an organic cotton ready-made warp from SAORI.

Happy Weaving,

Terri

Posted on Wed, 04/03/2013 - 12:59

Good morning all. I'm so thrilled to find this on-line community - almost as thrilled as I was to discover my most local Saori studio is on Saltspring (do I hear long weekend?!!). I have had several looms follow me around the last few moves and finally laid out all the pieces on the floor to see what I had. Not knowing where to begin, a little google here and standing looking at the pile from various angles, it dawned on me the pieces were not meant to fit together, but were three individual looms - 2 rigid heddle Bergere's and a Penelope tapestry loom. There is also a century old loom in the garage thr has multiple handles dangly things, and other parts that I haven't quite yet been ready for.

These looms have all been passed to me as I seem to be a collector of things that could be purposeful at some point. I've always picked up or saved little items here and there, strips fabric from quilting, twine from tying up veggies... I love the idea of including them with intention into more of a free style weaving. It will blend the nubby handspun wools I've acquired with the sleek skeins I've picked up at the LYS when they caught my eye.

Saori was a wonderful unintimidating way to finally begin, and I'm so looking forward to see what comes of this.

Posted on Fri, 05/09/2014 - 13:51

SAORI weaving is more exciting than the several others I've tried. It yields many surprises, offers an opportunity to use up all kinds of yarns, and is a license to break the rules and freely experiment. I like simple looms and simple weave structure where color and texture dominate. I live in a complex work world developing computer applications. It is so, so nice to be free of that occassionally.

I do have a SAORI SX60 loom, but there is no place to set it up, so it lives in storage. Most of my weaving is done on rigid heddle looms. I teach weaving on rigid heddle, inkle, and card looms at The Art League in Alexandria, VA.

Right now I'm living in an area where there is a lot happening. When I retire, which might be at the end of this year, I'll be moving to a very conservative upper mid-west town to be near my family. That'll give me more time to weave and keep up with things on social media...which I probably will need at that point.

Posted on Sat, 10/04/2014 - 17:21

Does anyone know the difference between a saori loom and any other 2 or 4 harness loom? Not trying to anger anyone but I just don't get what the difference is in the weaving. Of course I've never seen a saori loom in person so enlighten me please.

Posted on Fri, 10/24/2014 - 20:54

Found my own answer... saori looms can be adjusted for people with special physical needs, which is pretty cool.

Posted on Fri, 10/24/2014 - 20:54

Found my own answer... saori looms can be adjusted for people with special physical needs, which is pretty cool.

Posted on Mon, 05/18/2015 - 20:11

Hi all,

I'm Michele and super excited to learn Saori weaving.  I'm taking a workshop on Saltspring in June.  I started more traditional weaving on a small simple ridgid heddle (Cricket) last winter and enjoyed the process.  Then I got a small portable frame and love the flexibility.  I'm a yarn addict and love all the possiblities that Saori appears to bring.  Looking forward to June!

Posted on Mon, 06/08/2015 - 14:45

I'm a new/old weaver.  I started weaving about ten years ago, but after weaving three projects - a sample for Deborah Chandler's Learning to Weave (my "bible"), a summer-and-winter piece for clothing, and an overshot table runner, I drifted away.  I didn't quit due to lack of interest, just disorganization from  changing life circumstances; new job, moves, child needs.  You know.

Well, I'm back and so glad to find you all!

I weave on a 36-inch Leclerc Art is at.  I also spin and dye.  My most recent project was a scarf with double weave pockets (a " prototype " made with cotton yarn; sett is 24 epi.).  I can post a picture if anyone is interested.

I'm very happy to be a member and I've been reading your posts as a guest for a couple of months.