Newbie with a tie up question

 First of all let me apologize if I'm not doing this right... I've spent the last half hour trying to figure out how to post a question, I could not find a forum button anywhere!!!! 

I also didn't know I've been a member for two years!!! I don't even remember joining.

I received a beautiful baby wolf loom for Christmas and I'm trying to learn to weave. I am currently weaving a 3 pillow project from a craftsy class, and while that is going well  have a draft question. 

I don't know how to put a picture on here to show you what I'm talking about but if anyone has the book The handweavers pattern directory by Anne Dixon my question is about the tie up on page 104.

im trying to understand all the blocks , how can they show 10 tie ups for a 4 shaft loom? 

Ive actually searched the internet for several hours trying to understand tie ups. I understand how to tie up when they are showing 6 blocks ( or treadles) because two are usually for plain weave but when they have more than that I get confused...all the books I have explain the tie ups but not enough to make me understand fully. I don't know if I'm over complicating this or what.

Thanks in advance!!!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Comments

Posted on Thu, 01/26/2017 - 16:15

Each vertical row represents one treadle.  If you had 10 treadles on your loom, you could tie it up as shown and just treadle away. Most 4 shaft looms don't have 10 treadles. If you look at the first treadling, it uses the third to the sixth vertical columns, so you tie up your treadles using those.  If you want to use the last treadling, you use the last four columns to tie up.  

Posted on Thu, 01/26/2017 - 16:16

Each vertical row represents one treadle.  If you had 10 treadles on your loom, you could tie it up as shown and just treadle away. Most 4 shaft looms don't have 10 treadles. If you look at the first treadling, it uses the third to the sixth vertical columns, so you tie up your treadles using those.  If you want to use the last treadling, you use the last four columns to tie up.  

Posted on Thu, 01/26/2017 - 16:17

Each vertical row represents one treadle.  If you had 10 treadles on your loom, you could tie it up as shown and just treadle away. Most 4 shaft looms don't have 10 treadles. If you look at the first treadling, it uses the third to the sixth vertical columns, so you tie up your treadles using those.  If you want to use the last treadling, you use the last four columns to tie up.  

Posted on Thu, 01/26/2017 - 16:18

Each vertical row represents one treadle.  If you had 10 treadles on your loom, you could tie it up as shown and just treadle away. Most 4 shaft looms don't have 10 treadles. If you look at the first treadling, it uses the third to the sixth vertical columns, so you tie up your treadles using those.  If you want to use the last treadling, you use the last four columns to tie up.  

Posted on Thu, 01/26/2017 - 16:18

Each vertical row represents one treadle.  If you had 10 treadles on your loom, you could tie it up as shown and just treadle away. Most 4 shaft looms don't have 10 treadles. If you look at the first treadling, it uses the third to the sixth vertical columns, so you tie up your treadles using those.  If you want to use the last treadling, you use the last four columns to tie up.  

Posted on Thu, 01/26/2017 - 16:34

Sorry about the multiple posts.  The site was not working, then apparently caught up.

Posted on Fri, 01/27/2017 - 17:38

 Funny the site crashed so I didn't even think this posted!!!

Thanks, your explanation makes sense and as I thought I'm over complicating the tie up by not looking at the whole picture!!! 

Thank you again for your answer...

Posted on Sat, 02/10/2018 - 00:16

Hello weavers,

While I believe I understand the explanation provided to Chickeemama's question posted below, could someone please help me comprehend other tie ups also shown in Anne Dixon's Handweaver's Pattern Directory which appear to go beyond 6 treadles. I just don't get it...

A few examples: page 38, p.59, p.74, p.168, p.175, etc.

I have newly acquired Schacht 4-shafts / 6 treadles Mighty Wolf.

Warm thanks for your guidance!

Posted on Sat, 02/10/2018 - 16:43

The explanation is exactly the same as posted above.  One threading can produce multiple patterns, based on the tie up.

Posted on Thu, 02/15/2018 - 15:57

Page 38: The tie up box.

The first four columns, reading left to right, show this tie up:

1+2, 2+3, 3+4, 1+4. (2 shafts are tied to each treadle.)

The next four columns show this:

1, 2, 3, 4. A single shaft is tied to each treadle. This is also called a direct tie up or skeleton tie up.

At this point, you would need 8 treadles on your loom if you wanted to have a separate treadle for each pattern pick indicated in the tie up box on this page, or 12 teadles if you wanted all the options tied up. As you discovered, 4-shaft looms come with a maximum of 6 treadles.

However, you can leave your loom set up as a "direct" tie up (the second example) and use both feet to depress the treadle combinations needed to produce all 12 of the shedding options given in the tie up diagram on these pages. For your "extra" two treadles, I would tie them up to plain weave: 1+3, 2+4.

If you were weaving on a table loom, you wouldn't think twice about treadling the first pattern on page 38 by depressing the following combination of levers: 124, 134, 234, 123, 4, 3, 2, 1. You just do the same on your floor loom, using your feet. If you need to depress 3 treadles, use one foot to cover two treadles.

I hope this explains it?

 

 

Posted on Fri, 03/02/2018 - 16:00

Hi,

I am sorry for the slow reply, I just noticed help had arrived! ; )

Thank you very much for taking the time to answer my question. If I understand well, anytime a tie-up grid in Anne Dixon's book shows a pattern appearing to require more than six treadles, I should use a direct tie-up and use the two extra treadles for tabby.

Please let me know if I am wrong.

Again, many thanks!

Posted on Sun, 03/04/2018 - 00:27

No, the directions do not call out direct tie up, and the treadling sequence will not give you the pattern pictured if you substitute a direct tie up for the tie up directions..  Please read the above comments completely and thoroughly.  The book shows more than 6 treadles to save space on the page to show multiple tie up options.  You use the treadle configuration needed for the pattern you are using, and ignore the rest.

Posted on Sun, 03/04/2018 - 03:40

Thank you for your reply!

Indeed, I did not obtain the pattern pictured. Frown

Being self-thaught has its limitations...

 

Posted on Sun, 03/04/2018 - 20:05

Suzywool,

I do not have Ann Dixon's book to hand, or access it to it today, so I can not offer assistance right this moment. I will do my best to look at it tomorrow and try to explain.

I believe the answer is going to be you either use a direct tie-up method, which is possible on floor looms and how table looms are set up by default, or change the tie-up between weaving patterns. I know changing the tie-up in between will sound daunting when you are new, but the more you change it the more you learn about tieing up your loom and the less daunting it becomes.

Let me know what loom you are using and, if I can, I'll provide more specific information for you.

Happy weaving,

Erica

Posted on Sun, 03/04/2018 - 21:19

Seems I asked this same question a few years ago and finally understood the procedure to use the treading just for your chosen pattern and ignore the rest. It’s a big learning curve, weaving, but so rewarding!

Posted on Sun, 03/04/2018 - 21:19

Seems I asked this same question a few years ago and finally understood the procedure to use the treading just for your chosen pattern and ignore the rest. It’s a big learning curve, weaving, but so rewarding!

Posted on Tue, 03/13/2018 - 17:40

For some reason I ignore, I do not receive notifications for new comments posted, hence my very slow replies... I have once again edited my profile in hopes that it will help.

Thank you so much to all of you for your guidance and encouragement!  It is indeed a very long learning curve...

I have once again read Deborah Chandler's Learning to weave book, this time actually doing much of the suggested assignments. I have to say I am getting a better understanding of the whole process going through all this information a second time! 

With the aim of soon being able to weave huck lace, I am looking for the ''Light and Lacy Huck Lace Scarf'' pattern from Handwoven, which was published, I believe, in May/June 2009. I have seen many versions of this lovely scarf the web, but have had no success in finding the pattern. If someone could please provide, I would be extremely grateful! Wink

Warm thanks,

Suzanne

Posted on Wed, 03/14/2018 - 16:00

If someone "Provides" you with this pattern they are breaking 

copyright laws.  You can buy past issues of Handwoven from Interweave, and their project patterns are copyrighted.  As a weaver that designs my own patterns and sells my work, I am  more sensitive than most to copyrights.  Some published patterns have no copyright restrictions.  Some restrict sale and distribution (this is where your "Provide" comes in).  Some restrict sale, distribution, and prohibit sale of goods made.  Handwoven is the latter.

Posted on Sun, 03/25/2018 - 13:03

to bwsd--sale and distribution of the pattern,not the object?  if i make something from a pattern in handwoven magazine, i can give it to someone as a gift?  

Posted on Sun, 03/25/2018 - 15:00

I believe Handwoven restricts sale of the woven goods using their patterns as well as the pattern and other printed material in their mag.  you are allowed personal use and gifting. I am also very interested in copyright protections for artists and am extremely (overly?) cautious of posting pictures of my designs.  i see too often photos on pintrest, facebook ect., and people making copies or asking "how do I make this".  There is a line between insipiration and stealing -and there is not a clear boundry. (and then there is enforcement, which is a comletely different discussion!) I was quite surprised to see what many people think is acceptable "inspiration", what I think is stealing.  Would love to see this as an active discussion.

Posted on Sun, 03/25/2018 - 15:03

Of course, you can gift your item, it is the pattern itself that is copyrighted. However, to avoid asking yourself this question all the time, it is highly recommended to use your weaving books and resources as a tool to learning how to design and draft your own patterns. Much more satisfying and you are free to do what you want with your production.

Weaving is such a creative pastime BECAUSE it is not filled with kits and free patterns - each of us becomes a textile designer.

Posted on Mon, 03/26/2018 - 00:31

Sara is correct, you can use goods made yourself, give them, but not sell them.  I agree with Sara that one of the most rewarding parts of this craft/art is watching your own pattern take shape on the loom.  The copyright restrictions can be found in the first pages of a publication, and as I mentioned, they vary.