Welcome to the Macomber loom group site

I have been asked to form this group. Cheryl my wife of 33 years and I own, at this time, 4 Macomber looms. A 48 inch 4H (soon to be a 8H) this is Cheryl's workhorse, a 56 inch, 16H, a 56 inch 8H and a 48 inch 4H. The last two are being restored and will be sold. We also own a Newcomb studio loom and a copy of a Harrisville 22 inch 4h loom which I built in 1984. Since we are down sizing the Newcome loom will also be sold. Cheryl has been weaving on the Newcomb loom for 28 years but has since fallen in love with her Macomber looms. You can post your question here for everyone to see or you can IM me or sent me a email at whpenfield at hotmail.com

Welcome,

Michael

Comments

Posted on Mon, 12/28/2015 - 13:22

Hi Michael,

I thank you for your input on my B5 40".   I am merrily coming along on getting it to function.  I used silicon on the lamms and vaseline on the jacks and some silicon in the wood slats where the wires go through.  The wires I sanded with steel wool.  Seems to be working.  We'll see when I get all the harnesses hung.  I'm waiting for new heddles to arrive.  I have a couple of pieces that I'm not sure what they are.  I'm attaching photos here.  

1.  This piece is about 40" wide and has hooks on either end.

2.  I have two of these which are less than 40" and have notches on wither end. 

Any idea what they are and where they go on the loom?

Thanks!

Dana

Posted on Mon, 12/28/2015 - 13:22

Hi Michael,

I thank you for your input on my B5 40".   I am merrily coming along on getting it to function.  I used silicon on the lamms and vaseline on the jacks and some silicon in the wood slats where the wires go through.  The wires I sanded with steel wool.  Seems to be working.  We'll see when I get all the harnesses hung.  I'm waiting for new heddles to arrive.  I have a couple of pieces that I'm not sure what they are.  I'm attaching photos here.  

1.  This piece is about 40" wide and has hooks on either end.

2.  I have two of these which are less than 40" and have notches on wither end. 

Any idea what they are and where they go on the loom?

Thanks!

Dana

Posted on Sat, 01/23/2016 - 21:21

It looks like this group may not be frequented anymore, but I'm hoping someone will see this and give me a hint. I have a 48 inch, 10 shaft Macomber and I know the weird little bar thing attached to the bottom part where the jacks are is to hold the shafts up while threading (I think). I can see how it would hold one shaft up at a time, but is there any way to hold them all up? I am attaching three photos. Thanks for any advice. Perhaps it only works for one shaft at a time. Since I'm threading for tapestry, this doesn't seem useful to me.

Posted on Sat, 01/23/2016 - 21:21

It looks like this group may not be frequented anymore, but I'm hoping someone will see this and give me a hint. I have a 48 inch, 10 shaft Macomber and I know the weird little bar thing attached to the bottom part where the jacks are is to hold the shafts up while threading (I think). I can see how it would hold one shaft up at a time, but is there any way to hold them all up? I am attaching three photos. Thanks for any advice. Perhaps it only works for one shaft at a time. Since I'm threading for tapestry, this doesn't seem useful to me.

Posted on Sat, 01/23/2016 - 22:08

Hi Rebecca,

I think the bar at the bottom pushes down the lamm to help get the hooks in the treadles rather than holding up the shafts.  I usually hold up the shafts by placing a stick shuttle or a dowel under the jacks at the top of the loom, placing it across the loom frame after lifting the jacks either by treadling or by hand.

Maybe Michael will see your question and give a better answer!

Tommye

Posted on Sat, 01/23/2016 - 22:41

Thank you Tommye for your reply.  What you have is called a lamm depresser and like tommye stated it is used to hold down a group of lamms so that you can put the hooks on all of, say the 8 shaft at one time. When tieing up the treadles most people work from back to front putting hooks on all of the same shaft in your draft. When dressing the loom most weavers will hold down their two tabbie treadles to raise up all of the shaft and put a stick, dowel or something through the jacks to keep all the shafts up. Now Tommye is a master tapestry weaver/teacher but I think she does most, if not all of her tapestry work on a tapestry loom.

You can see a picture here of how the dowels are used.

 

Michael

http://www.ravelry.com/discuss/macomber-looms/2534365/1-25#10

    

Posted on Mon, 01/25/2016 - 01:22

Hello all, this is a wonderful forum Cool

I am a newbie to looms. I have recently inherited a B4 Macomber that belonged to my Grandfather. It is partially disassembled and I would like to get it Up And Running but I am not sure even where to start.

I have searched around on the web a bit for possible assembly diagrams and that also was confusing as there were a lot of already assembled diagrams. They were useful in helping me get familiar with the terminolgy and names of the parts as well as where some of the pieces will eventually go.

But...my dilema is what pieces to start with first...

I know this seems a vague and maybe confusing request but I can send pictures of the loom "as is" that could hopefully show what I am up against as for the "Art of the Start"

Any suggestions or directions would be MUCH appreciated as I am looking forward to learning how to weave on this loom.

I guess its the Journey of a Thousand miles starts with a single step...

Posted on Mon, 01/25/2016 - 01:45

Were do you live? I will try and put you in touch with a Mac owner or a weaving group. Second step, a Mac is not hard to put together it is just knowing were to start. For that pictures would be helpful. Here is a link to adding pictures: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E5ltD2y86MU 

I am going to be on the road tomorrow picking up yarn in NC.

I know once we have your loom up and weaving you will enjoy it as you think about your grandfather.

Michael

Posted on Thu, 03/03/2016 - 21:43

On older Guild member wants to sell her 46" 4 shaft Macomber. How can I help her figure out a price? I don't see anything on eBay or KBBspin.  I'd like to help her sell it.

Posted on Thu, 03/03/2016 - 21:50

Did not make a 46 inch loom, 40 or 48?. Measure the inside of the heddle frame to get the weaving width.Number of frames? Does it have a number on the data plate on the side of the castle?

Michael 

Posted on Thu, 03/03/2016 - 22:24

I saw that, old eyes, slow brain. Heddles frames and shafts are one and the same thing.

Posted on Thu, 03/03/2016 - 22:42

Communication isn't the easiest -- but she says it's

McComber.  Ad-A-Harness 

B-5.      2722

 

L.W. McComber.  Saugus Mass

It sounds like she has 4 shafts installed 4 not, a couple of reeds and other equipment.  Still not getting a good answer on the size...

m

Posted on Thu, 03/03/2016 - 22:50

Can be:

B5~
• A=24”
• B=32”
• C=40” 

Posted on Thu, 03/03/2016 - 23:00

Loom can be a 24 inch, 32 or 40 inch (weaing width) loom

Posted on Fri, 03/04/2016 - 19:38

Hi there, I have more info on the Macomber I'm trying to price. The owner is an elderly woman in my guild so it's been a bit of a thing to get all the info. I can't find my original post on this, perhaps it was 'clean-up'.

It's  B5 Add-A-Harness with 2722 stamped on it. 

40" weaving width, 6 and 10 dent reeds,

4 shafts installed and she has the other 4, for a total of 8

She's including shuttles, rug yarn and 'stuff'...

Any help pricing or where I can turn to for help appreciated. I'm not terribly familiar with these looms but would like to help this person out and it's always satisfying to connect a weaver and a loom.

Thanks.

marie

 

Posted on Fri, 03/04/2016 - 23:29

Right now there is 40/4 in CA for $400 and a 40/8 in WA for $1000. Not knowing the condition and if all the parts for the other 4 shafts are there i can not venture a guess again without know more about the loom.

 

Michael 

Posted on Mon, 03/14/2016 - 23:09

Thank you, Michael and Cheryl, for starting this blog.  I just purchased a 1974 Macomber 40", 8-shaft loom from the original owner.  I am not familiar with the setup of this loom (I currently have a Harrisville Design), and she didn't have a manual or schematic.  Is there a free one out there somewhere?

Thanks again,

Theresa 

 

Posted on Sat, 03/26/2016 - 19:03

Glad to see there is a Macomber group.  I was just able to find a portable 8s Macomber.  Only having Leclerc looms, this will be a learning curve.  So excited, it will fit in my Mini Coop.  Now I just have to do my research to figure out how the tie ups work and if I have all the necessary pieces for it. Other than that she is in beautiful condition, other than needing a good rub down with beeswax.

Not sure what I'm going to do with the double back beams, but hooray, more learning!

Posted on Sat, 03/26/2016 - 23:14

Welcome to the Macomber group. I am guessing that this a "Baby Mac"
What part of MI are you in?

 

Michael

 

Posted on Sun, 03/27/2016 - 00:35

Thank you, I'm about 20 minutes south of Detroit in Gibraltar.  From what I'm seeing, yes it's a Baby Mac.  I was trying to see its age but not quite surE.  It doesn't have anything after the CP, just the numbers in the next box on the label.

Posted on Sun, 04/17/2016 - 18:05

Hi,

I am new to this group and just purchased a Macomber B4D 10 harness loom in a 20 harness frame.  It didn't occur to me that the width of this loom is significantly wider than the standard door frame of 29".  Is there a safe way to temporarily disassemble the loom to move up a flight of stairs without the base attached?  Any help you can provide would be much appreciated.  I am so disheartened at the moment as it sits in my garage.

Betsy

Posted on Sun, 04/17/2016 - 18:06

Hi,

I am new to this group and just purchased a Macomber B4D 10 harness loom in a 20 harness frame.  It didn't occur to me that the width of this loom is significantly wider than the standard door frame of 29".  Is there a safe way to temporarily disassemble the loom to move up a flight of stairs without the base attached?  Any help you can provide would be much appreciated.  I am so disheartened at the moment as it sits in my garage.

Betsy

Posted on Sun, 04/17/2016 - 18:07

Hi,

I am new to this group and just purchased a Macomber B4D 10 harness loom in a 20 harness frame.  It didn't occur to me that the width of this loom is significantly wider than the standard door frame of 29".  Is there a safe way to temporarily disassemble the loom to move up a flight of stairs without the base attached?  Any help you can provide would be much appreciated.  I am so disheartened at the moment as it sits in my garage.

Betsy

Posted on Mon, 04/18/2016 - 02:45

Remove the beater unit by lifting it off the pins. remove the cloth beam by lifting out the left side and pulling out the shaft from the right side. Be careful not to break the shaft. Unbolt the from beam (2 bolts). Remove the frames by opening up the S hook. Remove all the threadle hooks. Unbolt or unscrew (depending on your loom) 4 bolts from each side of the castle frame that are holding it to the base. Now you can remove the castle assy as one unit. You now have two major pieces to move upstairs. remember to take lots of pictures.

If you have any questions call me 706 453 7603

Michael       

Posted on Mon, 04/18/2016 - 03:50

Hi Michael,

Thank you so very much for the advice.  I will take a look at it when I am fresh.  This sounds like a huge endeavor.  Without an owner's manual from Macomber, owners are on their own.  Thank heavens you are generous with your time and knowledge to help others.  I may give you a call if I can't quite figure it out.  Where are you located so I don't call at an inappropriate time--I am in Seattle.

 

Kindest regards,

Betsy

Posted on Mon, 04/18/2016 - 03:53

You will also have to unbolt the metal bars from the back frame to the castle sides. Unbolt at the back frame. Your loom may or may not have one or two support brackets going from the threadle support to the castle cross pieces. One end is screwed from the underside of the loom and I am trying to remember how the other end is attached to the cross piece. I think it is screwed from the inside of the crosspiece. I will check tomorrow and let you know.

 

Michael

Posted on Mon, 04/18/2016 - 20:22

I have a 20 shaft B4.  It has moved with me through numerous houses and states, and I have never had to disassemble it.  I lift off the beater as Michael describes and also the cloth beam.  For weight reasons I remove the heddle frames.  On one occasion only, when there wasn't much room to manuver one one end I unhooked the brake and ended up folding the back and front beams over towards the bottom, after standing the loom on end.

All the doorways and staircases in question were standard sized.

We have had to angle the bottom a bit to get it through doorways, which can be tricky if there is a narrow hallway on one side.  I have often wondered which design features determined the maximum number of shafts , depth, etc.,  Macomber used for each model of loom, but heard rumors somewhere that the B4's were designed to fit through standard doors.

I've never had to disassemble mine . . . I've had it since around 1979-80 when it was brand new.

Posted on Mon, 04/18/2016 - 20:49

I have take a 48/12 upstairs using a hand truck and a helper. I did remove the beater and back beam but not the frames. Once it is standing up on the hand truck it can be turned. The trick with doorsways is getting part of the bottom around the door frame and twisting the rest in.

I just finished moving 2, 32 inch and one 48/12 macs from the front porch to the barn. I have a 56/16 on a dolly getting ready to load on my truck and take it to the barn to work on. Did I say I did this by myself. 10 more mins and I will try getting this big mother on my truck. 

Posted on Tue, 04/19/2016 - 19:16

Simple stairs, yes.  For the curved ones I hired a professional mover, but still no disassembly required beyond the basics.

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