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Swedish Lace Curtains

KarenIsenhower's picture
Swedish lace curtains
Project
Project Status: 
Finished
Project Date: 
Fri, 05/10/2013 - Sat, 07/20/2013
Yarn
Yarn: 20/2 Cotton
Color: White
Type: warp
Yarn: 20/2 Cotton
Color: White
Type: weft
Loom
Loom Used: 
Glimåkra Standard
Number of Shafts: 
4
Number of Treadles: 
3
Sett: 
22.50 EPI
Length on Loom: 
8.00 yd
Width on Loom: 
34.50 in
Finished Width: 
31.00 in
Notes: 

The Swedish lace curtains have a wonderful light, airy look and feel. I was overjoyed to see the "windows" take shape after washing the fabric. That made all the long hours of slow weaving worth it! This draft is from "The Big Book of Weaving" by Laila Lundell, p. 114. 

(A few more pics and descriptions at my blog, if you're interested.)

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endorph's picture
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Joined: 09/12/2011
Love love love

these Karen - you are making great progress through the Big Book! Have you posted pics of your piece from class last month?

ReedGuy's picture
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Joined: 01/13/2012
Awesome.

Very nice job. They look great. That book is full of great projects isn't it? They could almost be called drapes.

I plan on trying cord weave for curtains, talked about it before I guess. The method is in 'Warp and Weft'. I want to make button holes, only large ones for wooden rod. I have a wood furnace that can be dusty, so I would prefer not using white. Also these old farm houses get lots of dirty house flies for winter. Hmm, then some kind of airy drapes? Lots of ambition, no time.

Have you tried cord weave, Karen or Tina?

Sally Orgren's picture
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Joined: 06/08/2009
I love the photo of the cloth draped on a chair...

That says it ALL for me!

KarenIsenhower's picture
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Joined: 08/18/2011
Thank you!

I appreciate your kind compliments!

Tina, I hadn't thought of posting my workshop pics. I'll do that.

ReedGuy, no I haven't tried cord weave. I need to get out my "Warp and Weft" and find out what that is. The meaning of draperies may vary from region to region, because in my mind, draperies are heavy, lined window coverings, often with a pull. Curtains are generally lighter weight, lined or lined, and less formal. I wouldn't think of calling these curtains draperies or drapes.

Sally, that's my favorite pic because there's something about seeing the fresh new fabric and just enjoying it...

Joined: 08/05/2010
Karen, How absolutely

Karen,
How absolutely beautiful! Now, I'm the one inspired:)

ReedGuy's picture
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Joined: 01/13/2012
Karen, I meant sheers. :)

Karen, I meant sheers. :)

KarenIsenhower's picture
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Joined: 08/18/2011
Yes, sheers makes sense

ReedGuy, now we're speaking the same language.

KarenIsenhower's picture
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Thanks, Cathie

Cathie, your compliment means a lot! Thank you so much!

Joined: 06/08/2009
ReedGuy and Karen

- being a foreigner here, can I pls ask you to clarify?

The disctionaries I have access to (both boks and 'net) indicate that "curtain" and "drape(s)" are synonyms - which confuses me, in this constext.

"Sheer(s)" does nor exist as a noun (even though I might guess - but from your argument above I'm still confused).

Sorry if I'm a nuisance - but, I've found, the best (only?) way to understand subtleties is to ask - .

KarenIsenhower's picture
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Joined: 08/18/2011
Sorry for the confusion

Kerstin,

I guess I'm referring common usage in my home. I don't know if it's correct in any other regard. My mother always called the heavier, lined window coverings drapes or draperies. Ours had pinch-pleated headings and were on a drapery rod (sort of a track) so they could be easily opened with the drapery cord/pull. Although, some drapes are stationary and held open with tie-backs.

Curtains, on-the-other-hand, are light-weight fabric, often cotton, that are hung on simple curtain rods, cafe rods, or tension rods.

I don't know if I eliminated any confusion, but it makes sense to me. :)

KarenIsenhower's picture
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And sheers...

And sheers are the fine-weight curtains that hang behind the drapes (between the drapes and the window)--in the home I grew up in, anyway. My mother opened the drapes, but left the sheers closed, so "the sun would shine through, but not fade the furniture." Or, so she said.

ReedGuy's picture
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Joined: 01/13/2012
Kerstin here is a link to

Kerstin here is a link to more than what Karen and I are calling sheer. Sheer as a type of curtain is very open and airy in structure.

http://vintagefashionguild.org/lightest-open-weave-or-sheer-fabrics

endorph's picture
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Karen

your explanation is exactly what I understand between drapes and curtains - in theory they are all draperies - but to my mind drapes are heavy - more formal - window coverings. Curtains are lighter weight, just on a rod - less formal maybe - sheers are panels that are semi- transparent, airy - whatever you call them - yours are beautiful!

ReedGuy's picture
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Joined: 01/13/2012
gauze fabric

Kerstin, another term you might try is gauze. Sometimes the foundation for patterned fabric.

A type of gauze used here is for food and game handling. One is cheese cloth. It was and maybe still is used in cheese making. It is also used when hunting game, like moose and deer, to handle the quartered up meat. It was also used during milk processing in a cream separator, a sheet was secured over the bowl of the separator before the milk was poured. When we make canned jellies we often cook the fruit and hang this afterward in cheese cloth to get the juice. But you know all that anyway, your not in the third world. ;)

Joined: 06/08/2009
"draperies"

So draperies, then, is the generic for something that hangs, possibly also covers - to be divided into curtains, drapes... Are blinds in the same catgory? (The more you know/think, the more confused you get... ;-)

 

(RG - the weaver in me sees gauze first as a weave structure. Do you mean you can say "I got out the summer gauzes today" as a synonym to "I got out the summer curtains today"?)

ReedGuy's picture
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Joined: 01/13/2012
sheers and curtains

No. We say we got out the sheers. ;) I was just giving you a word to compare to sheers.

I different example in language. A potato plant, an egg plant and a tomato plant are nightshades. But we don't say we baked a nightshade for dinner. What did we bake? :)

Sheers are actually for daytime privacy only. They don't insulate or block UV that much. And at night you can see right into a room from outside. We use drapes to defind a heavy curtain with a backing that resists UV and blocks heat from the sun. They are often closed at night to slow heat loss through glass in cold winter as well.

A blind might be in a category called shades or maybe that's the other way around. ;)

English, they say, is about the hardest language to get your head around. And punctuation, like in any language, can change the understanding of what is trying to be communicated. :)

Kelly Range's picture
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Joined: 06/17/2010
Sheers and Curtains

    Well, I sheerly love you extra fine curtains! Beautiful!

KarenIsenhower's picture
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Thanks!

I appreciate the compliment, Kelly. And I enjoyed the laugh. :-)